bryankonietzko
bryankonietzko:

I’m sure this meme is dead by now, but it still cracks me up.
The Legend of Korra has been picked up for an additional 26 episodes, which will be split into Books 3 & 4! Mike and I had been hoping to announce this big news to the crowd at the Korra SDCC panel tomorrow morning, but the network put out a press release yesterday. And as we suspected, people are pretty confused, understandably so. Hopefully people are also excited.
I’m sure I’ll be trying to clear this up in posts for a long time to come, but I’ll lay it all out right now:
–Book 1 = 12 episodes
–Book 2 = 14 episodes
–Book 3 = 13 episodes
–Book 4 = 13 episodes
–TOTAL = 52 episodes
Why are the four books split up into those numbers of episodes, you might ask?
Initially, Nickelodeon picked up Korra as a 12-episode miniseries. Their idea was to do 12-episode arcs that were more standalone than the original Avatar series. Mike and I were cool with this idea, as we had originally wanted the seasons to be 12 episodes long instead of 20, and creatively we liked the idea of doing tighter story arcs.
The original plan was that if Nickelodeon wanted more episodes, they would order them 12 episodes at a time. But while we were in production on Book 1, Nickelodeon decided to change their season lengths from 20 episodes (like Avatar had) to the more standardized international length of 26 episodes. They liked how Book 1 was coming out and decided to round out the order to fit their new 26-episode mold, and we got a 14-episode pick-up, which became Book 2.
Then, the network wanted even more Korra, so they picked up another order of 26 episodes. Mike and I wanted to stick with the shorter “books,” so creatively we are splitting the second order of 26 into Books 3 & 4, 13 episodes each.
What makes this even more confusing is that the network considers each block of 26 episodes a “season,” which is another reason we try to stick to calling these Korra arcs “books.” So for the network’s purposes, Books 1 & 2 are Season 1, and Books 3 & 4 are Season 2.
When will Books 2, 3, and 4 come out?
Someday!
What will happen after Book 4?
Mike and I plan to wrap up the Korra storyline at that point with the close of Book 4. Then I plan to crawl into a dark cave and go into hibernation. And hopefully see my wife more often.
I hope that clears it up. SEE YOU IN SAN DIEGO! If you can’t make the panel and Nick booth signing tomorrow, we’ll be signing at the Dark Horse booth on Saturday, I *think* at 2:30 (but I’m not sure). If you are going to SDCC, please be safe! You probably already heard, but tragically a convention attendee died in an accident on Tuesday morning. Take care.

bryankonietzko:

I’m sure this meme is dead by now, but it still cracks me up.

The Legend of Korra has been picked up for an additional 26 episodes, which will be split into Books 3 & 4! Mike and I had been hoping to announce this big news to the crowd at the Korra SDCC panel tomorrow morning, but the network put out a press release yesterday. And as we suspected, people are pretty confused, understandably so. Hopefully people are also excited.

I’m sure I’ll be trying to clear this up in posts for a long time to come, but I’ll lay it all out right now:

–Book 1 = 12 episodes

–Book 2 = 14 episodes

–Book 3 = 13 episodes

–Book 4 = 13 episodes

–TOTAL = 52 episodes

Why are the four books split up into those numbers of episodes, you might ask?

Initially, Nickelodeon picked up Korra as a 12-episode miniseries. Their idea was to do 12-episode arcs that were more standalone than the original Avatar series. Mike and I were cool with this idea, as we had originally wanted the seasons to be 12 episodes long instead of 20, and creatively we liked the idea of doing tighter story arcs.

The original plan was that if Nickelodeon wanted more episodes, they would order them 12 episodes at a time. But while we were in production on Book 1, Nickelodeon decided to change their season lengths from 20 episodes (like Avatar had) to the more standardized international length of 26 episodes. They liked how Book 1 was coming out and decided to round out the order to fit their new 26-episode mold, and we got a 14-episode pick-up, which became Book 2.

Then, the network wanted even more Korra, so they picked up another order of 26 episodes. Mike and I wanted to stick with the shorter “books,” so creatively we are splitting the second order of 26 into Books 3 & 4, 13 episodes each.

What makes this even more confusing is that the network considers each block of 26 episodes a “season,” which is another reason we try to stick to calling these Korra arcs “books.” So for the network’s purposes, Books 1 & 2 are Season 1, and Books 3 & 4 are Season 2.

When will Books 2, 3, and 4 come out?

Someday!

What will happen after Book 4?

Mike and I plan to wrap up the Korra storyline at that point with the close of Book 4. Then I plan to crawl into a dark cave and go into hibernation. And hopefully see my wife more often.

I hope that clears it up. SEE YOU IN SAN DIEGO! If you can’t make the panel and Nick booth signing tomorrow, we’ll be signing at the Dark Horse booth on Saturday, I *think* at 2:30 (but I’m not sure). If you are going to SDCC, please be safe! You probably already heard, but tragically a convention attendee died in an accident on Tuesday morning. Take care.

venezuelablog

Media Bias in Venezuela

venezuelablog:

Mark Weisbrot

There is a common perception in the US that Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez has a big media advantage over the opposition in the upcoming elections. The Committee to Protect Journalists, in its latest report on Venezuela, states that “a vast state media presence echoes the government’s positions,” and refers to the government as having a “media empire.”

From the Wilson Center’s latest report, we read: “Media coverage is not even moderately balanced.  … In television, the government’s predominance is overwhelming; it was estimated that by 2007 it controlled seven national television channels and 35 open community channels.”

Read More

peacecorps
stineinwonderland:

In my Oral English speaking and listening class we spent about a month “traveling” to different places in America. We discussed the culture and lifestyles of New York, Florida, Washington D.C. and California. All of which are places my students hope to get the chance to visit one day. While we were discussing California, I decided it would be a good idea to discuss my version of “Environmental Get Down “aka how can we environmentally make the world a better place. I talked about California as a green state and we discussed 5-6 ways we could help the environment. This of course involved me tell my students they should “eat less meat” because cows “fart and burp” methane gases. This turned into to a big laugh, because most people in China think its unhealthy to not eat meat, and because I was in front of a group of 30 students explaining the English words “fart” and “burp” furthering my students ideas that I’m “extremely weird but they love me.” By the end of the lesson I had my students choose one topic that they thought was most interesting and had them create Be Green Comics. The next class they shared the stories they created, all of which turned out fantastic and really interesting. They all loved it so much that next semester I’m going to be doing an “Adventure club” secondary product. This will involve me and some students hiking around different areas of Chongqing and discussing different ways we can help the environment, and maybe even planting some flowers and trees along the way. Check the pictures for the final results 😍

stineinwonderland:

In my Oral English speaking and listening class we spent about a month “traveling” to different places in America. We discussed the culture and lifestyles of New York, Florida, Washington D.C. and California. All of which are places my students hope to get the chance to visit one day. While we were discussing California, I decided it would be a good idea to discuss my version of “Environmental Get Down “aka how can we environmentally make the world a better place. I talked about California as a green state and we discussed 5-6 ways we could help the environment. This of course involved me tell my students they should “eat less meat” because cows “fart and burp” methane gases. This turned into to a big laugh, because most people in China think its unhealthy to not eat meat, and because I was in front of a group of 30 students explaining the English words “fart” and “burp” furthering my students ideas that I’m “extremely weird but they love me.” By the end of the lesson I had my students choose one topic that they thought was most interesting and had them create Be Green Comics. The next class they shared the stories they created, all of which turned out fantastic and really interesting. They all loved it so much that next semester I’m going to be doing an “Adventure club” secondary product. This will involve me and some students hiking around different areas of Chongqing and discussing different ways we can help the environment, and maybe even planting some flowers and trees along the way. Check the pictures for the final results 😍

cpdusuhist

cpdusuhist:

Photo of soldiers in VietnamLike veterans of all wars, those who served in Vietnam came home bearing physical and emotional scars. Anecdotal reports of veterans’ families in Utah, Wyoming, Nevada, New Mexico and the Navajo Nation are rife with stories of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and substance…

theatlantic
theatlantic:

In Focus: Tough Guy 2012

Billed as “the toughest race in the world,” the Tough Guy 2012 competition took place yesterday in Perton, England. Every year, thousands of men and women tackle the course, which is described on the Tough Guy website as eight country miles filled with freezing mud and “barbed wire, cuts, scrapes, burns, dehydration, hypothermia, acrophobia, claustrophobia, electric shocks, sprains, twists, joint dislocation and broken bones.” See more.
[Image: Michael Regan/Getty]

theatlantic:

In Focus: Tough Guy 2012

Billed as “the toughest race in the world,” the Tough Guy 2012 competition took place yesterday in Perton, England. Every year, thousands of men and women tackle the course, which is described on the Tough Guy website as eight country miles filled with freezing mud and “barbed wire, cuts, scrapes, burns, dehydration, hypothermia, acrophobia, claustrophobia, electric shocks, sprains, twists, joint dislocation and broken bones.” See more.

[Image: Michael Regan/Getty]